Red Seaweeds for February!

I’ve been busy planning the 2023 harvest cycle after I picked up my tide book. Did you know we can only harvest seaweed a maximum of 40 days a year? Those days are all between April and the end of July. We work with the moon phases (new and full moon) because these are the times during the summer when there are negative tides. This means we can get to the seaweed-filled rock areas in the ocean for about 1-2 hours each day (4-5 days in a row) to harvest as quickly as possible before the sea covers the rocks and seaweeds over again. It is vital to work! It is also very cyclical, like a woman’s monthly moon cycle.
This month, I want to introduce you to RED seaweeds. Three classifications of seaweeds are identified by color: red, brown, and green.

Stock up on Sea Palm!

Sea Palm (Postelsia palmaeformis) is one of our most popular seaweeds growing only in the nutrient-rich waters of the Pacific Northwest. Sea Palm resembles tiny palm trees, therefore its name. It is a brown seaweed, meaning it is chock-full of live enzymes, trace minerals, vitamins, complex carbohydrates, and algae. Sea Palm is perfect for adding to any dish you cook, with its mild umami flavor. It is also a delicious snack on its own – right out of the bag.

Ocean Ribbons!

Hello Dear Seaweed Blog Subscribers! I took some time off from blogging this past summer to complete the years seaweed harvest, and I am back with a great recipe for you! Ocean Ribbons or Lessionopsis littoralis are beautiful flowing ribbons of brown seaweed that grow on the outermost rocks of the intertidal zone. We harvestContinue reading “Ocean Ribbons!”

Bladderwrack/Fucus Seaweed for your Health!

Bladderwrack or Fucus distichus is one of the most popular sea vegetables growing along most coasts and  has been used for centuries all over the world as medicine. The brown seaweed is the #1 superfood as far as iodine and polysaccharide content.

2022 Seaweed foraging opportunities!

Seaweed foraging classes are right around the corner and we want to invite folks to come out and harvest with Ocean Harvest in a different way this year. Since our foraging classes are always in high demand, we want to offer more opportunities in a low-key fashion this year at a lower price.

Sea cabbage makes great vegan jerky!

Sweet Kombu or sea cabbage (Hedophyllum sessile) grows in clusters like a cabbage bed.  We harvest the blades that have bubbly indentations, as these are high in polysaccharides, which give this sea vegetable its sweet smoky aftertaste. Sweet Kombu is a brown seaweed. It can be eaten like a chip right out of the bag, as well as  cooked in stews,Continue reading “Sea cabbage makes great vegan jerky!”

Wakame – the Women’s Seaweed

Wakame (Alaria marginata) on the west coast of California is a beautiful, magnificently abundant genus of marine algae. This nutritious, edible seaweed is considered a brown seaweed. The long, broad, gracefully flowing ribbons of Alaria cling to the rocks in the lower intertidal zones.  The olive-green fronds grow to over 30 feet in length andContinue reading “Wakame – the Women’s Seaweed”

Turkish towel!

Turkish Towel for the Bath (Chondracanthus exasperates) is known for its healing properties for the skin. Our skin is an amazing organ, and can absorb the potassium, calcium, iodine, and magnesium found in seaweeds. This gorgeous red seaweed is unique in its appearance and its uses! It is widely known as the Turkish towel becauseContinue reading “Turkish towel!”